Thursday , December 14 2017
Home | Americas | Trump team in fresh war of words with US media

Trump team in fresh war of words with US media

Key figures in Donald Trump’s administration have become embroiled in a fresh war of words with the media.

On Saturday the president had condemned media reporting of the number of people attending his inauguration.

White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus said there was “an obsession… to de-legitimise this president. We’re not going to sit around and take it.”

But photos appear to show more people attended the inauguration of Mr Trump’s predecessor Barack Obama in 2009.

Mr Priebus said on Fox News Sunday that the “media from day one has been talking about de-legitimising the election”. He said Mr Trump’s presidency would fight such coverage “tooth and nail every day”.

The latest row was mainly sparked by the inauguration figures.

There were no official estimates. Mr Trump said during a visit to the CIA on Saturday that it “looked like a million and a half people”, but provided no evidence. He called reporters “among the most dishonest human beings on Earth” for saying it was far lower.

His press secretary Sean Spicer outlined figures amounting to 720,000 people in Washington’s National Mall, despite also saying that “no-one had numbers” for the inauguration.

He also said it was the “largest audience to ever witness an inauguration – period – both in person and around the globe”.

Many US outlets, using photos of the National Mall showing the difference in numbers attending the 2009 inauguration and Mr Trump’s, hit out at Mr Spicer’s statements.

The New York Times denounced “false claims” and described the statements as a “striking display of invective and grievance at the dawn of a presidency”.

Both CNN and ABC News went into detail to refute Mr Spicer’s claims.

‘Alternative facts’

Top Trump aide Kellyanne Conway also criticised the media in a feisty exchange on NBC.

She was challenged by Chuck Todd on NBC’s Meet the Press to say why Mr Spicer’s first appearance had been to “utter a probable falsehood”.

“If we are going to keep referring to our press secretary in those type of terms, I think we are going to have to rethink our relationship here,” she said.

Pressed on Mr Spicer’s claims, she said he had been presenting “alternative facts”.

“Alternative facts are not facts they are falsehoods,” Todd replied.

Source: BBC

About Admin

Check Also

Millions hit the streets in worldwide May Day rallies

People across the world participate in demonstrations to mark the May 1 International Workers’ Day. …

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Advertisment ad adsense adlogger